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Open Access Publications from the University of California

The Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems is a research, education, and public service program at the University of California, Santa Cruz, dedicated to increasing ecological sustainability and social justice in the food and agriculture system. Our mission is to research, develop, and advance sustainable food and agricultural systems that are environmentally sound, economically viable, socially responsible, nonexploitative, and that serve as a foundation for future generations. The Center's work covers a spectrum that includes both theoretical and applied research, academic education and practical training, and public service for audiences ranging from local school children to international agencies. The Center is a part of UCSC's Social Sciences Division.

On the UCSC campus the Center manages the 25-acre UCSC Farm and the 2-acre Alan Chadwick Garden as sites for teaching, training, and research in organic horticulture and agricutlure. Both sites are open to the public daily.

Dr. Daniel Press, Director
CASFS
University of California, Santa Cruz
1156 High St.
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
831.459-3240
casfs.ucsc.edu

Cover page of Mapping the markets: the relative density of retail food stores in densely populated census blocks in the central coast region of California

Mapping the markets: the relative density of retail food stores in densely populated census blocks in the central coast region of California

(2006)

Research in the United Kingdom and more recently in the United States has found geographic differences in access to affordable, nutritious food. In some cases more limited access has been associated with a higher proportion of residents in ethnic minority groups. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), we explored the potential existence of “food deserts” and their relationship with ethnicity in Santa Cruz, Monterey and San Benito Counties. Relative to the region as a whole, there were few clusters of census blocks with less access to retail food outlets with fresh produce (grocery stores, supermarkets and fruiterias) after adjusting for population density. In addition, access to these retail food outlets was not associated with the percentage of the population that was Latino. However, we identified some areas that would benefit from further investigation, and that may be suitable locations for locating new fruit and vegetable markets. Such markets may benefit local residents, as well as new, limited-resource, and minority farmers who often have inadequate access to distribution networks for their produce.

Cover page of Central Coast consumers want more food-related information, from safety to ethics

Central Coast consumers want more food-related information, from safety to ethics

(2006)

Information is lacking on what consumers want to know about food production, processing, transportation, and retailing. Focus groups and a random-sample mail survey of consumers in the Central Coast region indicate that food safety and nutrition generate the most interest. However, ethical concerns such as the humane treatment of animals, the environmental impacts of food production, and social justice for farmworkers also have strong support. The results suggest that voluntary food labels on these issues may be a promising way to meet consumer needs for more information.

Cover page of 2001-2003 Activity Report and Research Summary

2001-2003 Activity Report and Research Summary

(2003)

The 2001-2003 Activity Report/Research Summary reports on the research, education, and public outreach work of the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems from July 1, 2001 through June 30, 2003.

Cover page of 1999-2001 Activity Report and Research Summary

1999-2001 Activity Report and Research Summary

(2001)

The 1999–2001 Activity Report/Research Summary reports on the research, education, and public outreach work of the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems from July 1, 1999 through June 30, 2001.