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Cover page of Phasor-Based Assessment for Harmonic Sources in Distribution Networks

Phasor-Based Assessment for Harmonic Sources in Distribution Networks

(2020)

Phasor-based interdependencies of multiple harmonic sources, especially Distributed Energy Resources, on distribution networks are analyzed in this paper. A new index, Phasor Harmonic Index (IPH), is proposed by the authors. IPH considers both harmonic source magnitude and phase angle for different harmonic orders. Other commonly used harmonic indices are based solely on magnitude of waveforms. A very detailed model of a distribution network is used in the harmonic assessment. With the help of the detailed distribution network model, the phase couplings and the phase balancing impacts on harmonic propagation between three phases are investigated. Moreover, effects of harmonic source phase angle deviations are analyzed at both the customer side and the substation side. This paper investigates the importance of phase angles in harmonic assessment and how distribution netwo

Cover page of Open-Source, Open-Architecture SoftwarePlatform for Plug-InElectric Vehicle SmartCharging in California

Open-Source, Open-Architecture SoftwarePlatform for Plug-InElectric Vehicle SmartCharging in California

(2020)

This interdisciplinary eXtensible Building Operating System–Vehicles project focuses on controlling plug-in electric vehicle charging at residential and small commercial settings using a novel and flexible open-source, open-architecture charge communication and control platform. The platform provides smart charging functionalities and benefits to the utility, homes, and businesses.

This project investigates four important areas of vehicle-grid integration research, integrating technical as well as social and behavioral dimensions: smart charging user needs assessment, advanced load control platform development and testing, smart charging impacts, benefits to the power grid, and smart charging ratepayer benefits.

Cover page of EcoBlock: Grid Impacts, Scaling, and Resilience

EcoBlock: Grid Impacts, Scaling, and Resilience

(2017)

Widespread deployment of EcoBlocks has the potential to transform today's electricity system into one that is more resilient, flexible, efficient and sustainable. In this vision, the system will consist of self- su cient, renewable-powered, block-scale entities that can deliberately adjust their net power exchange and can optimize performance, maintain stability, support each other, or disconnect entirely from the grid as needed. This report is intended as an independent analysis of the potential relationships, both constructive and adverse, between EcoBlocks and the grid.

Cover page of Application of Advanced Early Warning Systems with Adaptive Protection

Application of Advanced Early Warning Systems with Adaptive Protection

(2015)

This project developed and field-tested two methods of Adaptive Protection systems utilizing synchrophasor data. One method detects conditions of system stress that can lead to unintended relay operation, and initiates a supervisory signal to modify relay response in real time to avoid false trips. The second method detects the possibility of false trips of impedance relays as stable system swings “encroach” on the relays’ impedance zones, and produces an early warning so that relay engineers can re-evaluate relay settings. In addition, real-time synchrophasor data produced by this project was used to develop advanced visualization techniques for display of synchrophasor data to utility operators and engineers.

Cover page of An Assessment of PIER Electric Grid Research 2003-2014 White Paper

An Assessment of PIER Electric Grid Research 2003-2014 White Paper

(2015)

This white paper describes the circumstances in California around the turn of the 21st century that led the California Energy Commission (CEC) to direct additional Public Interest Energy Research funds to address critical electric grid issues, especially those arising from integrating high penetrations of variable renewable generation with the electric grid. It contains an assessment of the beneficial science and technology advances of the resultant portfolio of electric grid research projects administered under the direction of the CEC by a competitively selected contractor, the University of California’s California Institute for Energy and the Environment, from 2003-2014.

Cover page of Diagnostic Applications for Micro-Synchrophasor Measurements

Diagnostic Applications for Micro-Synchrophasor Measurements

(2014)

This report articulates and justifies the preliminary selection of diagnostic applications for data from micro-synchrophasors (µPMUs) in electric power distribution systems that will be further studied and developed within the scope of the three-year ARPA-e award titled Micro-synchrophasors for Distribution Systems.

Cover page of Every Moment Counts: Synchrophasors for Distribution Networks with Variable Resources

Every Moment Counts: Synchrophasors for Distribution Networks with Variable Resources

(2014)

Chapter 34 in the textbook, "Renewable Energy Integration: Practical Management of Variability, Uncertainty and Flexibility"

Cover page of Challenges to the Integration of Renewable Resources at High System Penetration

Challenges to the Integration of Renewable Resources at High System Penetration

(2014)

Successfully integrating renewable resources into the electric grid at penetration levels to meet a 33 percent Renewables Portfolio Standard for California presents diverse technical and organizational challenges. This report characterizes these challenges by coordinating problems in time and space, balancing electric power on a range of scales from microseconds to decades and from individual homes to hundreds of miles. Crucial research needs were identified related to grid operation, standards and procedures, system design and analysis, and incentives, and public engagement in each scale of analysis. Performing this coordination on more refined scales of time and space independent of any particular technology, is defined as a “smart grid.” “Smart” coordination of the grid should mitigate technical difficulties associated with intermittent and distributed generation, support grid stability and reliability, and maximize benefits to California ratepayers by using the most economic technologies, design and operating approaches.

Cover page of The Local Team: Leveraging Distributed Resources to Improve Resilience

The Local Team: Leveraging Distributed Resources to Improve Resilience

(2014)

In recent years, extreme weather events have severely affected the performance of the electric grid. Very large-scale events (VLSE) with potentially catastrophic impacts on the grid pose more than an inconvenience in today's electricity-driven lifestyle, and the frequency and severity of such events may continue to increase as a consequence of global climate change. This article summarizes the state of the art in leveraging distributed resources to improve resilience of the electric grid. It also highlights the technical questions that need to be addressed through additional research and development if the value of distributed resources is to be maximized. Published in "Power and Energy Magazine", Volume: 12, Issue: 5

Cover page of Grid Futures through Scenario Planning

Grid Futures through Scenario Planning

(2013)

For most of the 20th century, the electric grid had a relatively simple role: moving electricity from central power plants to the consumers. Its behavior was predictable, operation was largely deterministic, and an operator was in control. But with growing uncertainty, aging infrastructure and uncertainty in energy markets, we must begin to think about the future of the energy grid and restructuring to effectively rise to these challenges.