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Cotsen Institute of Archaeology

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About

The Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press is the academic publishing division of the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, a premier research organization dedicated to the creation, dissemination, and conservation of archaeological knowledge and heritage. The Cotsen Institute is also home to both the Interdepartmental Archaeology Program and the UCLA/Getty Master's Program in Archaeological and Ethnographic Conservation. Since 1975, the Cotsen Institute Press (formerly the Publications Unit) has served to preserve cultural heritage through the documentation and publication of scholarly archaeological research. Specializing in producing high-quality academic titles, our press publishes approximately 10 volumes per year in nine series, including a new digital series hosted on eScholarship. Acquisitions are monitored by an Editorial Board composed of distinguished UCLA and external faculty and are accepted based on the results of critical peer review. For more information about our press, please visit our Web site http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/publications/introduction.

Cotsen Institute of Archaeology

There are 98 publications in this collection, published between 1976 and 2020.
Cotsen Digital Archaeology series (3)

Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

How is the Web transforming the professional practice of archaeology? And as archaeologists accustomed to dealing with “deep time,” how can we best understand the possibilities and limitations of the Web in meeting the specialized needs of professionals in this field? These are among the many questions posed and addressed in Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration, edited by Eric Kansa, Sarah Whitcher Kansa, and Ethan Watrall. With contributions from a range of experts in archaeology and technology, this volume is organized around four key topics that illuminate how the revolution in communications technology reverberates across the discipline: approaches to information retrieval and information access; practical and theoretical concerns inherent in design choices for archaeology’s computing infrastructure; collaboration through the development of new technologies that connect field-based researchers and specialists within an international archaeological community; and scholarly communications issues, with an emphasis on concerns over sustainability and preservation imperatives. This book not only describes practices that attempt to mitigate some of the problems associated with the Web, such as information overload and disinformation, it also presents compelling case studies of actual digital projects—many of which are rich in structured data and multimedia content or focused on generating content from the field “in real time,” and all of which demonstrate how the Web can and is being used to transform archaeological communications into forms that are more open, inclusive, and participatory. Above all, this volume aims to share these experiences to provide useful guidance for other researchers interested in applying technology to archaeology.

  • 1 supplemental PDF

The World According to Basketry

This book was originally published in 1999 by the Leiden University, Center of Non-Western Studies. This is an unabridged re-publication of the 1999 edition, and the one-hour movie that is an integral part of the book. You can download the movie as mp4 file under the tab “Supporting Material”. At a future date the full integration of text and video (as specified in Appendix C of the book) will be offered through this stable URL as well.

  • 1 supplemental video

Who is afraid of basketry

A guide to recording basketry and cordage for archaeologists and ethnographers

  • 1 supplemental file
Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press (95)

Chotuna and Chornancap: Excavating an Ancient Peruvian Legend

Christopher Donnan's Chotuna and Chornancap: Excavating an Ancient Peruvian Legend, explores one of the most intriguing oral histories passed down among ancient Peruvians: the legend of Naymlap, the founder of a dynasty that ruled the Lambayeque Valley of northern Peru centuries before European contact. Naymlap is said to have built his palace at a place that many now consider to be the archaeological sites of Chotuna and Chornancap. In an effort to test the validity of the Naymlap legend, Donnan directed extensive archaeological excavations at Chotuna and Chornancap--completing plans of the monumental architecture, mapping and excavating most of the major structures, and developing a chronology for the sites. This book presents the results of these excavations and demonstrates the extent to which the archaeological evidence correlates with the sequence of events described in the Naymlap legend.

Series: Monographs 70

Central California Coastal Prehistory: A View from Little Pico Creek

Reports on excavations at Little Pico Creek in San Luis Obispo County and assesses the temporal components and issues of cultural chronology, subsistence, mobility, and social structure.

Series: Perspectives in California Archaeology 3

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