Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

The UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies was established in 1999 with a mission to promote outstanding research and teaching about the region. Southeast Asia encompasses the modern states of Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Burma (Myanmar), Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei, the Philippines, and East Timor. To these ends the Center facilitates faculty and graduate research, assists students with fellowships and awards, supports the teaching of four Southeast Asian languages, presents public lectures and cultural programs, conducts outreach and teacher-training programs in the wider community, organizes conferences, and hosts visiting scholars from around the world. The Center also works closely with UCLA's Interdisciplinary Degree Program in Southeast Asian Studies, supports new faculty positions and expanded course offerings, and contributes to the development of library holdings and services.

Cover page of Reflections on Processing the Schirmer Papers

Reflections on Processing the Schirmer Papers

(2007)

Processing the papers of Boone Schirmer was a wonderful experience for an undergraduate. The papers provided a memorable education both about a unique individual, and about an important period in history. Some of Schirmer's quirks also were revealed in the process.

Cover page of Boone Schirmer and the Early Days of the Philippines Information Bulletin, Friends of the Filipino People, and the Philippines Program at Goddard-Cambridge

Boone Schirmer and the Early Days of the Philippines Information Bulletin, Friends of the Filipino People, and the Philippines Program at Goddard-Cambridge

(2006)

Daniel Boone Schirmer had a lasting impact on the movement in the United States to oppose martial law in the Philippines from 1972 until his death in 2006. He was active in several AMLM institutions such as the Philippines Information Bulletin, Friends of the Filipino People, and the Philippines program of the Goddard-Cambridge Graduate Program in Social Change.

Cover page of Remembering Boone

Remembering Boone

(2006)

I am honored to pay tribute to Daniel Boone Schirmer. Others already mentioned Boone’s important role during the Martial Law period, especially his critique of US policies in support of the Marcos dictatorship and the role of U.S. military bases. I will use this occasion to share some personal stories about Boone for those who did not know him personally.

Cover page of America's Next Top Model: The Philippines and the U.S. Empire

America's Next Top Model: The Philippines and the U.S. Empire

(2006)

U.S. policymakers and pundits have often trumpeted U.S. policy in the Philippines as a model -- of colonialism, of democracy, of counter-insurgency -- that could be applied world wide. In fact, however, the Philippine model was always based on misrepresentation, and the lessons that we should take from the Philippine case are rather different from those usually mentioned. The Philippine model is examined during the period of the conquest at the turn of the last century; in 1946, when formal independence was achieved; during the anti-Huk campaign of the early 1950s; during martial law; and during the People Power revolt of 1986. In all these versions, the U.S. government stood as an opponent of the democratic aspirations of the Philippine people.

Cover page of U.S. Bases by Another Name: ACSA in the Philippines

U.S. Bases by Another Name: ACSA in the Philippines

(1995)

Philippine-U.S. relations appear to be on the verge of a radical and retrogressive shift -- re-instating U.S. military dominance of the island nation after it had been seriously challenged by the Philippine Senate's defeat of the bases treaty in 1991 -- and returning the Philippines once again to a limited role on the world stage as Washington's military subordinate, a part first thrust upon it by U.S. colonization nearly one hundred years ago. The pivot of this threatening reversion is an "Acquisition and Cross-Servicing Agreement" (ACSA). However, opposition is growing to the proposed agreement, especially in the Philippines.

Cover page of The Landing at Leyte -- After Fifty Years

The Landing at Leyte -- After Fifty Years

(1994)

For one who would like to see U.S. relations with the Philippines democratic in form and content, the landing of General Douglas MacArthur at Leyte in October 1944 inspires feelings that are decidedly ambivalent. On the one hand the landing signifies the defeat of Japanese rule in the Philippines, and so can be seen as an important link in the global victory over the fascist axis. So much is positive. But in moving from a consideration of the general and global meaning of the event to its more particular and local significance for the Philippine people, the picture becomes darker, more negative. Viewed from this standpoint the MacArthur landing bears a striking resemblance to an earlier U.S. military incursion in Philippine affairs, Admiral George Dewey’s entry into Manila Bay in 1898.

Cover page of Standard Questions -- Friends of the Filipino People

Standard Questions -- Friends of the Filipino People

(1994)

A brief overview of the history of the group Friends of the Filipino People from the vantage point of twenty-one years since its founding. Framed in answer to questions submitted by researchers.

Cover page of Talk at the Anniversary Celebration of the Defeat of the Bases Treaty

Talk at the Anniversary Celebration of the Defeat of the Bases Treaty

(1993)

Talk delivered by Daniel Boone Schirmer in Manila, Philippines celebrating the 1991 vote in the Philippine Senate that rejected the renewal of the treaty between the United States and the Philippines to allow the continuation of U.S. military bases in the Philippines. The bases were closed in 1992, a year after the treaty was rejected.

Cover page of The Global Policeman and Subic Base

The Global Policeman and Subic Base

(1991)

U.S. military domination of the Third World -- its role as global policeman -- serves to compensate on the international scene for its relative economic decline. This provides the context in which to understand the U.S. attempt to keep Subic Naval Base in the Philippines.

Cover page of Peace: The Moral Issue of the Day

Peace: The Moral Issue of the Day

(1991)

The wars of foreign intervention waged by the United States in the 20th century have made the struggle against war the over-arching moral issue facing the nation. This struggle against war and imperialism upholds the best democratic traditions of the U.S. embodied in the revolution against British imperial rule.