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Bioengineering murine mastocytoma cells to produce anticoagulant heparin.

  • Author(s): Gasimli, Leyla
  • Glass, Charles A
  • Datta, Payel
  • Yang, Bo
  • Li, Guoyun
  • Gemmill, Trent R
  • Baik, Jong Youn
  • Sharfstein, Susan T
  • Esko, Jeffrey D
  • Linhardt, Robert J
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3919470/
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Heparin (HP), an important anticoagulant polysaccharide, is produced in a complex biosynthetic pathway in connective tissue-type mast cells. Both the structure and size of HP are critical factors determining the anticoagulation activity. A murine mastocytoma (MST) cell line was used as a model system to gain insight into this pathway. As reported, MST cells produce a highly sulfated HP-like polysaccharide that lacks anticoagulant activity (Montgomery RI, Lidholt K, Flay NW, Liang J, Vertel B, Lindahl U, Esko JD. 1992. Stable heparin-producing cell lines derived from the Furth murine mastocytoma. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89:11327-11331). Here, we show that transfection of MST cells with a retroviral vector containing heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase-1 (Hs3st1) restores anticoagulant activity. The MST lines express N-acetylglucosamine N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1, uronosyl 2-O-sulfotransferase and glucosaminyl 6-O-sulfotransferase-1, which are sufficient to make the highly sulfated HP. Overexpression of Hs3st1 in MST-10H cells resulted in a change in the composition of heparan sulfate (HS)/HP and CS/dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans. The cell-associated HS/HP closely resembles HP with 3-O-sulfo group-containing glucosamine residues and shows anticoagulant activity. This study contributes toward a better understanding of the HP biosynthetic pathway with the goal of providing tools to better control the biosynthesis of HP chains with different structures and activities.

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