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Healthcare burden among individuals with Angelman syndrome: Findings from the Angelman Syndrome Natural History Study.

  • Author(s): Khan, Nasreen
  • Cabo, Raquel
  • Tan, Wen-Hann
  • Tayag, Regina
  • Bird, Lynne M
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.1002/mgg3.734
Abstract

Background

The objective of this study is to describe healthcare resource utilization (HRU) and supportive therapy utilization (STU) among individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS), and to compare such usage by molecular etiology.

Methods

Participants were categorized into deletion and non-deletion genotypes. Statistical differences were assessed using an independent samples t test.

Results

Data were available on 302 individuals. Mean age of participants was 5.5 years, 92% of whom were less than 13 years, and 71% had the deletion etiology. About 68% of participants had at least one hospitalization since birth to enrollment in the study; the average number of hospitalizations during that time period was 2.3 and average length of stay was 4.5 days. The most common reasons for hospitalization were seizures, lower respiratory infections, and surgery. The most common reasons for surgery were myringotomy, strabismus surgery, tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, and gastrostomy tube insertion/fundoplication. Anticonvulsants, gastroesophageal reflux disease, sleep, and behavioral medications were the most commonly prescribed drugs. STU was high among individuals with AS.

Conclusions

This study shows that individuals with AS have high HRU/STU, and apart from a few differences, HRU/STU was similar across molecular etiology. These results reflect usage in younger individuals and studies that describe HRU/STU in older individuals are needed.

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