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Spatial dynamics of multistage cell lineages in tissue stratification

  • Author(s): Chou, CS
  • Lo, WC
  • Gokoffski, KK
  • Zhang, YT
  • Wan, FYM
  • Lander, AD
  • Calof, AL
  • Nie, Q
  • et al.
Abstract

In developing and self-renewing tissues, terminally differentiated (TD) cell types are typically specified through the actions of multistage cell lineages. Such lineages commonly include a stem cell and multiple progenitor (transit-amplifying) cell stages, which ultimately give rise to TD cells. As the tissue reaches a tightly controlled steady-state size, cells at different lineage stages assume distinct spatial locations within the tissue. Although tissue stratification appears to be genetically specified, the underlying mechanisms that direct tissue lamination are not yet completely understood. Herein, we use modeling and simulations to explore several potential mechanisms that can be utilized to create stratification during developmental or regenerative growth in general systems and in the model system, the olfactory epithelium of mouse. Our results show that tissue stratification can be generated and maintained through controlling spatial distribution of diffusive signaling molecules that regulate the proliferation of each cell type within the lineage. The ability of feedback molecules to stratify a tissue is dependent on a low TD death rate: high death rates decrease tissue lamination. Regulation of the cell cycle lengths of stem cells by feedback signals can lead to transient accumulation of stem cells near the base and apex of tissue. © 2010 by the Biophysical Society.

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