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Efficacy and tolerability of 3 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing antiretroviral regimens for treatment-naïve volunteers infected with HIV-1: A Randomized, controlled equivalence trial

  • Author(s): Lennox, JL
  • Landovitz, RJ
  • Ribaudo, HJ
  • Ofotokun, I
  • Na, LH
  • Godfrey, C
  • Kuritzkes, DR
  • Sagar, M
  • Brown, TT
  • Cohn, SE
  • McComsey, GA
  • Aweeka, F
  • Fichtenbaum, CJ
  • Presti, RM
  • Koletar, SL
  • Haas, DW
  • Patterson, KB
  • Benson, CA
  • Baugh, BP
  • Leavitt, RY
  • Rooney, JF
  • Seekins, D
  • Currier, JS
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4412467/pdf/nihms637050.pdf
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

© 2014 American College of Physicians. Objective: To evaluate 3 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing initial antiretroviral regimens to show equivalence for virologic efficacy and tolerability.Background: Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy is not suitable for all treatment-naive HIVinfected persons.Design: A phase 3, open-label study randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio with follow-up for at least 96 weeks. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00811954) Setting: 57 sites in the United States and Puerto Rico.Patients: Treatment-naive persons aged 18 years or older with HIV-1 RNA levels greater than 1000 copies/mL without resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or protease inhibitors.Intervention: Atazanavir, 300 mg/d, with ritonavir, 100 mg/d; raltegravir, 400 mg twice daily; or darunavir, 800 mg/d, with ritonavir, 100 mg/d, plus combination emtricitabine, 200 mg/d, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, 300 mg/d.Measurements: Virologic failure, defined as a confirmed HIV-1 RNA level greater than 1000 copies/mL at or after 16 weeks and before 24 weeks or greater than 200 copies/mL at or after 24 weeks, and tolerability failure, defined as discontinuation of atazanavir, raltegravir, or darunavir for toxicity. A secondary end point was a combination of virologic efficacy and tolerability.Results: Among 1809 participants, all pairwise comparisons of incidence of virologic failure over 96 weeks showed equivalence within a margin of equivalence defined as-10% to 10%. Raltegravir and ritonavir-boosted darunavir were equivalent for tolerability, whereas ritonavir-boosted atazanavir resulted in a 12.7% and 9.2% higher incidence of tolerability discontinuation than raltegravir and ritonavir-boosted darunavir, respectively, primarily because of hyperbilirubinemia. For combined virologic efficacy and tolerability, ritonavir-boosted darunavir was superior to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir, and raltegravir was superior to both protease inhibitors. Antiretroviral resistance at the time of virologic failure was rare but more frequent with raltegravir.Primary Funding Source: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.Limitation: The trial was open-label, and ritonavir was not provided.Conclusion: Over 2 years, all 3 regimens attained high and equivalent rates of virologic control. Tolerability of regimens containing raltegravir or ritonavir-boosted darunavir was superior to that of the ritonavir-boosted atazanavir regimen.

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