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Access to Improved Sanitation and Nutritional Status among Preschool Children in Nouna District, Burkina Faso.

  • Author(s): Bountogo, Mamadou
  • Ouattara, Mamadou
  • Sié, Ali
  • Compaoré, Guillaume
  • Dah, Clarisse
  • Boudo, Valentin
  • Zakane, Alphonse
  • Lebas, Elodie
  • Brogdon, Jessica M
  • Godwin, William W
  • Lin, Ying
  • Arnold, Benjamin F
  • Oldenburg, Catherine E
  • Étude CHAT Group
  • et al.
Abstract

Access to improved sanitation and hygiene may improve child nutritional status by reducing exposure to enteric pathogens. We evaluated this relationship as part of the Community Health with Azithromycin Trial, a community-randomized trial of azithromycin versus placebo for the prevention of child mortality in rural Burkina Faso. Before the baseline study visit, a door-to-door household survey was conducted for all households in the study area. During the baseline study census, which occurred approximately 9 months after the household survey, a mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) measurement was obtained from each child. We evaluated the relationship between household improved latrine use compared with unimproved latrines or open defecation and MUAC in children aged 6-59 months. Among 32,172 children with household survey data and MUAC measurements, 931 (2.9%) had an MUAC less than 12.5 cm and were classified as having moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). The odds of MAM were higher in children living in households with an unimproved latrine than those with an improved latrine (adjusted odds ratio: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.11-2.31). Children in households with unimproved latrines and households that practiced open defection had approximate 0.15 cm reduced MUAC compared with those in households with an improved latrine. There was a small, but statistically significant, association between improved latrine and nutritional status in preschool children as measured by MUAC.

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