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Examining the Proportion of Dietary Phosphorus From Plants, Animals, and Food Additives Excreted in Urine.

  • Author(s): St-Jules, David E
  • Jagannathan, Ram
  • Gutekunst, Lisa
  • Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar
  • Sevick, Mary Ann
  • et al.
Abstract

Phosphorus bioavailability is an emerging topic of interest in the field of renal nutrition that has important research and clinical implications. Estimates of phosphorus bioavailability, based on digestibility, indicate that bioavailability of phosphorus increases from plants to animals to food additives. In this commentary, we examined the proportion of dietary phosphorus from plants, animals, and food additives excreted in urine from four controlled-feeding studies conducted in healthy adults and patients with chronic kidney disease. As expected, a smaller proportion of phosphorus from plant foods was excreted in urine compared to animal foods. However, contrary to expectations, phosphorus from food additives appeared to be incompletely absorbed. The apparent discrepancy between digestibility of phosphorus additives and the proportion excreted in urine suggests a need for human balance studies to determine the bioavailability of different sources of phosphorus.

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