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Community health advisors assessing adherence to national cancer screening guidelines among African Americans in South Los Angeles.

  • Author(s): Maxwell, Annette E
  • Lucas-Wright, Aziza
  • Gatson, Juana
  • Vargas, Claudia
  • Santifer, Rhonda E
  • Chang, L Cindy
  • Tran, Khoa
  • et al.
Abstract

We partnered with African American churches in South Los Angeles (LA) and trained Community Health Advisors (CHAs) to assess cancer screening. The purpose of this analysis is to report adherence to national cancer screening guidelines among African Americans in South LA, to assess relationships between adherence to colorectal cancer and other cancer screening guidelines, and to explore regional differences in screening rates. Between 2016 and 2018, 44 CHAs surveyed 777 African Americans between 50 and 75 years of age. Among 420 South LA residents, 64% of men and 70% of women were adherent to colorectal cancer screening guidelines. Adherence to mammography screening guidelines was 73%. Adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines among women 50 to 65 years of age without hysterectomy was 80%. Fifty-nine percent of men had ever discussed the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test with a physician. Adherence to colorectal cancer screening guidelines was significantly higher among respondents who were adherent to other cancer screening guidelines compared to their peers who were not adherent to other cancer screening guidelines (all p < 0.05). The fact that 22% of women who were adherent to breast cancer screening, 32% of women adherent to cervical cancer screening and 16% of men who had discussed the PSA test with a physician were not adherent to colorectal cancer screening guidelines suggests that providers should redouble their efforts to review all screening guidelines with their patients and to make appropriate recommendations. Regional differences in screening rates within South Los Angeles should inform future screening promotion efforts.

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