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Direct interaction of the kringle domain of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and integrin alpha v beta 3 induces signal transduction and enhances plasminogen activation

  • Author(s): Tarui, Takehiko
  • Akakura, Nobuaki
  • Majumdar, Mousumi
  • Andronicos, Nicholas
  • Takagi, Junichi
  • Mazar, Andrew P
  • Bdeir, Khalil
  • Kuo, Alice
  • Yarovoi, Serge V
  • Cines, Douglas B
  • Takada, Yoshikazu
  • et al.
Abstract

It has been questioned whether there are receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) that facilitate plasminogen activation other than the high affinity uPA receptor (uPAR/CD87) since studies of uPAR knockout mice did not support a major role of uPAR in plasminogen activation. uPA also promotes cell adhesion, chemotaxis, and proliferation besides plasminogen activation. These uPA-induced signaling events are not mediated by uPAR, but mediated by unidentified, lower-affinity receptors for the uPA kringle. We found that uPA binds specifically to integrin alpha v beta 3 on CHO cells depleted of uPAR. The binding of uPA to alpha v beta 3 required the uPA kringle domain. The isolated uPA kringle domain binds specifically to purified, recombinant soluble, and cell surface alpha v beta 3, and other integrins (alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 9 beta 1), and induced migration of CHO cells in an alpha v beta 3-dependent manner. The binding of the uPA kringle to alpha v beta 3 and uPA kringle-induced alpha v beta 3-dependent cell migration were blocked by homologous plasminogen kringles 1-3 or 1-4 (angiostatin), a known integrin antagonist. We studied whether the binding of uPA to integrin alpha v beta 3 through the kringle domain plays a role in plasminogen activation. On CHO cell depleted of uPAR, uPA enhanced plasminogen activation in a kringle and alpha v beta 3-depenclent manner. Endothelial cells bound to and migrated on uPA and uPA kringle in an alpha v beta 3-dependent manner. These results suggest that uPA binding to integrins through the kringle domain plays an important role in both plasminogen activation and uPA-induced intracellular signaling. The uPA kringle-integrin interaction may represent a novel therapeutic target for cancer, inflammation, and vascular remodeling.

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