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The effect of inlet conditions on the performance and flowfield structure of a non-premixed swirl-stabilized distributed reaction

  • Author(s): Charles, RE
  • Emdee, JL
  • Muzio, LJ
  • Samuelsen, GS
  • et al.
Abstract

A model reactor is used to investigate the extent to which the overall performance and detailed flowfield structure of a non-premixed swirl-stabilized distributed reaction are sensitive to modest changes in inlet conditions (e.g., fuel injection angle, inlet geometry, and swirl vane solidity). Measurements of combustor performance are based on exhaust plane species concentration profiles (HC, CO2, CO, O2), combustion efficiency, and visual observation of combustor stability. The detailed flowfield structure is established by spatially mapping the axial and azimuthal velocity fields using two-component laser anemometry, and the temperature field using a thermocouple probe. The results show that relatively modest changes in inlet conditions can dramatically affect the flowfield structure. As an example, for the model reactor evaluated the addition of a small step at the outer boundary of the swirler yields significantly lower centerline axial velocities and a more uniform thermal structure in the recirculation zone. Furthermore, a modest reduction in swirl vane solidity transforms the aerodynamic structure of the recirculation zone from an off-axis to a central, on-axis structure. These results explain, in part, the contradictory conclusions drawn from data acquired in non-premixed swirl-stabilized distributed reactions, and establish that comparisons and generalizations of such flows require, at a minimum, (1) careful measurements and specification of the inlet conditions, (2) detailed measurements of the flow structure, and (3) an assessment of the effects of modest changes in key operating and configurational variables. © 1988 Combustion Institute.

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