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Differences in Daily Hassle Patterns Among California's Seriously Mentally Ill Sheltered Care Residents.

  • Author(s): Segal, Steven P
  • VanderVoort, Debra J
  • et al.
Creative Commons 'BY-NC-ND' version 4.0 license
Abstract

The present study investigated the daily hassles of a severely mentally ill population in sheltered care facilities in California. The results show that financial problems, loneliness, boredom, crime, accomplishments, verbal and written expression, and health were their most frequent concerns, reflecting the life-style of a low income, socially isolated, population whose disability renders an active, upwardly mobile life difficult. Age, gender, racial, and residential status differences in the most frequent and most severe hassles were found with age differences being the most pronounced. Younger individuals reported more hassles than elderly individuals, the nature of their concerns focus more on social acceptance, while physical health issues were of greater importance for elders. Racial differences were second in prominence, with discrimination issues being high in the minds of minority members of the population. Sheltered care residents were less stressed by problems with crime and declining physical abilities and more stressed by problems with exploitation and confrontation than were community dwellers.

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