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Colorectal cancer beliefs, knowledge, and screening among Filipino, Hmong, and Korean Americans

  • Author(s): Tran, MT
  • Jeong, MB
  • Nguyen, VV
  • Sharp, MT
  • Yu, EP
  • Yu, F
  • Tong, EK
  • Kagawa-Singer, M
  • Cuaresma, CF
  • Sy, AU
  • Tsoh, JY
  • Gildengorin, GL
  • Stewart, SL
  • Nguyen, TT
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/cncr.31216
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

© 2018 American Cancer Society BACKGROUND: To the authors' knowledge, there are few studies to date regarding colorectal cancer (CRC) beliefs, knowledge, and screening among multiple Asian American populations, who are reported to have lower CRC screening rates compared with white individuals. The current study was performed to assess knowledge and beliefs regarding the causes of CRC, its prevention, and factors associated with CRC screening among 3 Asian American groups. METHODS: The authors conducted an in-language survey with Filipino (Honolulu, Hawaii), Hmong (Sacramento, California), and Korean (Los Angeles, California) Americans aged 50 to 75 years who were sampled through social networks. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess factors associated with CRC screening. RESULTS: The sample of 981 participants was 78.3% female and 73.8% reported limited proficiency in English. Few of the participants were aware that age (17.7%) or family history (36.3%) were risk factors for CRC; 6.2% believed fate caused CRC. Only 46.4% of participants knew that screening prevented CRC (74.3% of Filipino, 10.6% of Hmong, and 55.8% of Korean participants; P<.001). Approximately two-thirds of participants reported ever having undergone CRC screening (76.0% of Filipino, 72.0% of Hmong, and 51.4% of Korean participants; P<.001) and 48.6% were up to date for screening (62.2% of Filipino, 43.8% of Hmong, and 41.4% of Korean participants; P<.001). Factors found to be significantly associated with ever screening were being Korean (compared with Filipino), having a family history of CRC, having health insurance or a regular source of health care, and knowing that a fatty diet caused CRC. Believing that fate caused CRC and that praying prevented it were found to be negatively associated with ever screening. Factors associated with being up to date for CRC screening included being born in the United States, having a family history of CRC, and having access to health care. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge regarding the causes of CRC and its prevention among Filipino, Hmong, and Korean individuals is low. However, health care access, not knowledge or beliefs, was found to be a key determinant of CRC screening. Cancer 2018;124:1552-9. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

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