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Extensive sequence variation in the 3' untranslated region of the KRAS gene in lung and ovarian cancer cases.

  • Author(s): Kim, Minlee
  • Chen, Xiaowei
  • Chin, Lena J
  • Paranjape, Trupti
  • Speed, William C
  • Kidd, Kenneth K
  • Zhao, Hongyu
  • Weidhaas, Joanne B
  • Slack, Frank J
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.4161/cc.27941
Abstract

While cancer is a serious health issue, there are very few genetic biomarkers that predict predisposition, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment response. Recently, sequence variations that disrupt microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of genes have been shown to be associated with many human diseases, including cancer. In an early example, a variant at one particular single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a let-7 miRNA complementary site in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the KRAS gene was associated with risk and outcome of various cancers. The KRAS oncogene is an important regulator of cellular proliferation, and is frequently mutated in cancers. To discover additional sequence variants in the 3' UTR of KRAS with the potential as genetic biomarkers, we resequenced the complete region of the 3' UTR of KRAS in multiple non-small cell lung cancer and epithelial ovarian cancer cases either by Sanger sequencing or capture enrichment followed by high-throughput sequencing. Here we report a comprehensive list of sequence variations identified in cases, with some potentially dysregulating expression of KRAS by altering putative miRNA complementary sites. Notably, rs712, rs9266, and one novel variant may have a functional role in regulation of KRAS by disrupting complementary sites of various miRNAs, including let-7 and miR-181.

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