Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

Cardiac sympathetic denervation in patients with refractory ventricular arrhythmias or electrical storm: Intermediate and long-term follow-up

  • Author(s): Vaseghi, M
  • Gima, J
  • Kanaan, C
  • Ajijola, OA
  • Marmureanu, A
  • Mahajan, A
  • Shivkumar, K
  • et al.

Published Web Location

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24291775
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Background Left and bilateral cardiac sympathetic denervation (CSD) have been shown to reduce burden of ventricular arrhythmias acutely in a small number of patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT) storm. The effects of this procedure beyond the acute setting are unknown. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intermediate and long-term effects of left and bilateral CSD in patients with cardiomyopathy and refractory VT or VT storm. Methods Retrospective analysis of medical records for patients who underwent either left or bilateral CSD for VT storm or refractory VT between April 2009 and December 2012 was performed. Results Forty-one patients underwent CSD (14 left CSD, 27 bilateral CSD). There was a significant reduction in the burden of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks during follow-up compared to the 12 months before the procedure. The number of ICD shocks was reduced from a mean of 19.6 ± 19 preprocedure to 2.3 ± 2.9 postprocedure (P <.001), with 90% of patients experiencing a reduction in ICD shocks. At mean follow-up of 367 ± 251 days postprocedure, survival free of ICD shock was 30% in the left CSD group and 48% in the bilateral CSD group. Shock-free survival was greater in the bilateral group than in the left CSD group (P =.04). Conclusion In patients with VT storm, bilateral CSD is more beneficial than left CSD. The beneficial effects of bilateral CSD extend beyond the acute postsympathectomy period, with continued freedom from ICD shocks in 48% of patients and a significant reduction in ICD shocks in 90% of patients. © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC Academic Senate's Open Access Policy. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Item not freely available? Link broken?
Report a problem accessing this item