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Regulation of delayed prostaglandin production in activated P388D1 macrophages by group IV cytosolic and group V secretory phospholipase A2s.

  • Author(s): Shinohara, H;
  • Balboa, MA;
  • Johnson, CA;
  • Balsinde, J;
  • Dennis, EA
  • et al.
Abstract

Group V secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) rather than Group IIA sPLA2 is involved in short term, immediate arachidonic acid mobilization and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in the macrophage-like cell line P388D1. When a new clone of these cells, P388D1/MAB, selected on the basis of high responsivity to lipopolysaccharide plus platelet-activating factor, was studied, delayed PGE2 production (6-24 h) in response to lipopolysaccharide alone occurred in parallel with the induction of Group V sPLA2 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). No changes in the level of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) or COX-1 were observed, and Group IIA sPLA2 was not detectable. Use of a potent and selective sPLA2 inhibitor, 3-(3-acetamide 1-benzyl-2-ethylindolyl-5-oxy)propanesulfonic acid (LY311727), and an antisense oligonucleotide specific for Group V sPLA2 revealed that delayed PGE2 was largely dependent on the induction of Group V sPLA2. Also, COX-2, not COX-1, was found to mediate delayed PGE2 production because the response was completely blocked by the specific COX-2 inhibitor NS-398. Delayed PGE2 production and Group V sPLA2 expression were also found to be blunted by the inhibitor methylarachidonyl fluorophosphonate. Because inhibition of Ca2+-independent PLA2 by an antisense technique did not have any effect on the arachidonic acid release, the data using methylarachidonyl fluorophosphonate suggest a key role for the cPLA2 in the response as well. Collectively, the results suggest a model whereby cPLA2 activation regulates Group V sPLA2 expression, which in turn is responsible for delayed PGE2 production via COX-2.

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