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CHD2 haploinsufficiency is associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and neurobehavioural problems.

  • Author(s): Chénier, Sébastien
  • Yoon, Grace
  • Argiropoulos, Bob
  • Lauzon, Julie
  • Laframboise, Rachel
  • Ahn, Joo Wook
  • Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie
  • Lionel, Anath C
  • Marshall, Christian R
  • Vaags, Andrea K
  • Hashemi, Bita
  • Boisvert, Karine
  • Mathonnet, Géraldine
  • Tihy, Frédérique
  • So, Joyce
  • Scherer, Stephen W
  • Lemyre, Emmanuelle
  • Stavropoulos, Dimitri J
  • et al.
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The chromodomain helicase DNA binding domain (CHD) proteins modulate gene expression via their ability to remodel chromatin structure and influence histone acetylation. Recent studies have shown that CHD2 protein plays a critical role in embryonic development, tumor suppression and survival. Like other genes encoding members of the CHD family, pathogenic mutations in the CHD2 gene are expected to be implicated in human disease. In fact, there is emerging evidence suggesting that CHD2 might contribute to a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders. Despite growing evidence, a description of the full phenotypic spectrum of this condition is lacking. METHODS: We conducted a multicentre study to identify and characterise the clinical features associated with haploinsufficiency of CHD2. Patients with deletions of this gene were identified from among broadly ascertained clinical cohorts undergoing genomic microarray analysis for developmental delay, congenital anomalies and/or autism spectrum disorder. RESULTS: Detailed clinical assessments by clinical geneticists showed recurrent clinical symptoms, including developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy, behavioural problems and autism-like features without characteristic facial gestalt or brain malformations observed on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Parental analysis showed that the deletions affecting CHD2 were de novo in all four patients, and analysis of high-resolution microarray data derived from 26,826 unaffected controls showed no deletions of this gene. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study, in addition to our review of the literature, support a causative role of CHD2 haploinsufficiency in developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and behavioural problems, with phenotypic variability between individuals.

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