Search for dark matter in events with a hadronically decaying vector boson and missing transverse momentum in $pp$ collisions at $\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector
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Search for dark matter in events with a hadronically decaying vector boson and missing transverse momentum in $pp$ collisions at $\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

  • Author(s): Collaboration, ATLAS
  • et al.
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License
Abstract

A search for dark matter (DM) particles produced in association with a hadronically decaying vector boson is performed using $pp$ collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of $\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb$^{-1}$, recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. This analysis improves on previous searches for processes with hadronic decays of $W$ and $Z$ bosons in association with large missing transverse momentum (mono-$W/Z$ searches) due to the larger dataset and further optimization of the event selection and signal region definitions. In addition to the mono-$W/Z$ search, the as yet unexplored hypothesis of a new vector boson $Z^\prime$ produced in association with dark matter is considered (mono-$Z^\prime$ search). No significant excess over the Standard Model prediction is observed. The results of the mono-$W/Z$ search are interpreted in terms of limits on invisible Higgs boson decays into dark matter particles, constraints on the parameter space of the simplified vector-mediator model and generic upper limits on the visible cross sections for $W/Z$+DM production. The results of the mono-$Z^\prime$ search are shown in the framework of several simplified-model scenarios involving DM production in association with the $Z^\prime$ boson.

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