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A model of nurses' intention to care of patients with COVID-19: Mediating roles of job satisfaction and organisational commitment.

  • Author(s): Sharif Nia, Hamid;
  • Arslan, Gökmen;
  • Naghavi, Navaz;
  • Sivarajan Froelicher, Erika;
  • Kaveh, Omolhoda;
  • Pahlevan Sharif, Saeed;
  • Rahmatpour, Pardis
  • et al.
Abstract

Aim and objectives

This study aims to test the hypothesis that job satisfaction and organisational commitment might play a mediating roles between workload, quality of supervision, extra-role behaviour, pay satisfaction and intention to care of patients with COVID-19.

Background

Given the high incidence of coronavirus and shortage of nurses in Iranian hospitals, learning about nurses' intention to care for patients with COVID-19 is important.

Design

In this cross-sectional study, 648 Iranian nurses were surveyed during March 2020. The online questionnaire consisted of two parts. The mediating role was explored for the following: job satisfaction and commitment in the association of workload, quality of supervisor, extra-role behaviours, and pay satisfaction with the intention to care. The study adhered to STROBE checklist for cross-sectional studies.

Results

The results of this study show that job satisfaction and organisational commitment mediated the relationship of nurses' workload, quality of supervisor, extra-role behaviours, and pay satisfaction with the intention to care for patients with COVID-19.

Conclusion

The results of the study indicate the importance of job satisfaction and organisational commitment as mechanisms that help to understand the association of nurses' workload, quality of supervisor, extra-role behaviours and pay satisfaction with the intention to care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Relevance to clinical practice

Hospital managers need to attend to the role of nurses' job satisfaction and other organisational factors to ensure that they can cope with the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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