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Dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein from HIV+ individuals promotes monocyte-derived foam cell formation in vitro.

  • Author(s): Angelovich, Thomas A
  • Hearps, Anna C
  • Oda, Michael N
  • Borja, Mark S
  • Huynh, Diana
  • Homann, Stefanie
  • Jaworowski, Anthony
  • Kelesidis, Theodoros
  • et al.
Abstract

Objective

The role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function in HIV-related atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is unclear. HDLs isolated from HIV [HIV(+)HDL] and HIV-uninfected individuals [HIV(-)HDL] were assessed for HDL function and ability to promote monocyte-derived foam cell formation (MDFCF; a key event in HIV-related CVD) ex vivo.

Design/methods

Using an established in-vitro model of atherogenesis and plasma samples from an established cross-sectional study of virologically suppressed HIV men on stable effective antiretroviral therapy and with low CVD risk (median age: 42 years; n = 10), we explored the impact of native HDL [HIV(+)HDL] on MDFCF. In this exploratory study, we selected HIV(+)HDL known to be dysfunctional based on two independent measures of impaired HDL function: antioxidant (high HDLox) ability of HDL to release apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) (low HDL-ApoA-I exchange). Five healthy men matched by age and race to the HIV group were included. Given that oxidation of HDL leads to abnormal HDL function, we also compared proatherogenic effects of HIV(+)HDL vs. chemically derived HDLox. The ex-vivo atherogenesis assay was performed using lipoproteins (purchased or isolated from plasma using ultracentrifugation) and monocytes purified via negative selection from healthy donors.

Results

HIV(+)HDL known to have reduced antioxidant function and rate of HDL/ApoAI exchange promoted MDFCF to a greater extent than HDL (33.0 vs. 26.2% foam cells; P = 0.015). HDL oxidized in vitro also enhanced foam cell formation as compared with nonoxidized HDL (P < 0.01).

Conclusion

Dysfunctional HDL in virologically suppressed HIV individuals may potentiate atherosclerosis in HIV infection by promoting MDFCF.The role of HDL function in HIV-related atherosclerotic CVD is unclear. HDL isolated from HIV [HIV(+)HDL] and HIV-uninfected individuals [HIV(-)HDL] were assessed for HDL function and ability to promote foam cell formation ex vivo. HIV(+)HDL known to have reduced antioxidant function and rate of HDL/ApoA1 exchange promoted MDFCF to a greater extent than HDL(-)HDL (33.0 vs. 26.2% foam cells.Subject codes: Inflammation, Lipids and Cholesterol, Vascular Biology, Oxidant Stress, Atherosclerosis.

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