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Perm1 promotes cardiomyocyte mitochondrial biogenesis and protects against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced damage in mice.

  • Author(s): Cho, Yoshitake
  • Tachibana, Shizuko
  • Lam, Kayla
  • Arita, Yoh
  • Khosrowjerdi, Shamim
  • Zhang, Oliver
  • Liang, Alex
  • Li, Ruixia
  • Andreyev, Aleksander
  • Murphy, Anne N
  • Ross, Robert S
  • et al.
Abstract

Normal contractile function of the heart depends on a constant and reliable production of ATP by cardiomyocytes. Dysregulation of cardiac energy metabolism can result in immature heart development and disrupt the ability of the adult myocardium to adapt to stress, potentially leading to heart failure. Further, restoration of abnormal mitochondrial function can have beneficial effects on cardiac dysfunction. Previously, we identified a novel protein termed Perm1 (PGC-1 and estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-induced regulator, muscle 1) that is enriched in skeletal and cardiac-muscle mitochondria and transcriptionally regulated by PGC-1 (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1) and ERR. The role of Perm1 in the heart is poorly understood and is studied here. We utilized cell culture, mouse models, and human tissue, to study its expression and transcriptional control, as well as its role in transcription of other factors. Critically, we tested Perm1's role in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial function and its ability to protect myocytes from stress-induced damage. Our studies show that Perm1 expression increases throughout mouse cardiogenesis, demonstrate that Perm1 interacts with PGC-1α and enhances activation of PGC-1 and ERR, increases mitochondrial DNA copy number, and augments oxidative capacity in cultured neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. Moreover, we found that Perm1 reduced cellular damage produced as a result of hypoxia and reoxygenation-induced stress and mitigated cell death of cardiomyocytes. Taken together, our results show that Perm1 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse cardiomyocytes. Future studies can assess the potential of Perm1 to be used as a novel therapeutic to restore cardiac dysfunction induced by ischemic injury.

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