Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

Age Does Matter: A Pilot Comparison of Placenta-Derived Stromal Cells for in utero Repair of Myelomeningocele Using a Lamb Model

  • Author(s): Brown, EG
  • Keller, BA
  • Lankford, L
  • Pivetti, CD
  • Hirose, S
  • Farmer, DL
  • Wang, A
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.1159/000433427
Abstract

© 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. Copyright: All rights reserved. Introduction: Fetal amniotic membranes (FM) have been shown to preserve spinal cord histology in the fetal sheep model of myelomeningocele (MMC). This study compares the effectiveness of placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSCs) from early-gestation versus term-gestation placenta to augment FM repair to improve distal motor function in a sheep model. Methods: Fetal lambs (n = 4) underwent surgical MMC creation followed by repair with FM patch with term-gestation PMSCs (n = 1), FM with early-gestation PMSCs (n = 1), FM only (n = 1), and skin closure only (n = 1). Histopathology and motor assessment was performed. Results: Histopathologic analysis demonstrated increased preservation of spinal cord architecture and large neurons in the lamb repaired with early-gestation cells compared to all others. Lambs repaired with skin closure only, FM alone, and term-gestation PMSCs exhibited extremely limited distal motor function; the lamb repaired with early-gestation PMSCs was capable of normal ambulation. Discussion: This pilot study is the first in vivo comparison of different gestational-age placenta-derived stromal cells for repair in the fetal sheep MMC model. The preservation of large neurons and markedly improved motor function in the lamb repaired with early-gestation cells suggest that early-gestation placental stromal cells may exhibit unique properties that augment in utero MMC repair to improve paralysis.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC Academic Senate's Open Access Policy. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Main Content
Current View