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Family history of breast and ovarian cancer and triple negative subtype in hispanic/latina women.

  • Author(s): Anderson, Kristin
  • Thompson, Patricia A
  • Wertheim, Betsy C
  • Martin, Lorena
  • Komenaka, Ian K
  • Bondy, Melissa
  • Daneri-Navarro, Adrian
  • Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes
  • Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique
  • Brewster, Abenaa
  • Madlensky, Lisa
  • Tobias, Malaika
  • Natarajan, Loki
  • Martínez, María Elena
  • et al.
Abstract

Familial breast and ovarian cancer prevalence was assessed among 1150 women of Mexican descent enrolled in a case-only, binational breast cancer study. Logistic regression was conducted to compare odds of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) to non-TNBC according to family history of breast and breast or ovarian cancer among 914 of these women. Prevalence of breast cancer family history in a first- and first- or second-degree relative was 13.1% and 24.1%, respectively; that for breast or ovarian cancer in a first-degree relative was 14.9%. After adjustment for age and country of residence, women with a first-degree relative with breast cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with TNBC than non-TNBC (OR=1.98; 95% CI, 1.26-3.11). The odds of TNBC compared to non-TNBC were 1.93 (95% CI, 1.26-2.97) for women with a first-degree relative with breast or ovarian cancer. There were non-significant stronger associations between family history and TNBC among women diagnosed at age <50 compared to ≥50 years for breast cancer in a first-degree relative (P-interaction = 0.14) and a first- or second-degree relative (P-interaction = 0.07). Findings suggest that familial breast cancers are associated with triple negative subtype, possibly related to BRCA mutations in Hispanic/Latina women, which are strongly associated with TNBC. Family history is an important tool to identify Hispanic/Latina women who may be at increased risk of TNBC, and could benefit from prevention and early detection strategies.

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