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Wine and other alcohol consumption and risk of ovarian cancer in the California Teachers Study cohort.

  • Author(s): Chang, Ellen T;
  • Canchola, Alison J;
  • Lee, Valerie S;
  • Clarke, Christina A;
  • Purdie, David M;
  • Reynolds, Peggy;
  • Bernstein, Leslie;
  • Stram, Daniel O;
  • Anton-Culver, Hoda;
  • Deapen, Dennis;
  • Mohrenweiser, Harvey;
  • Peel, David;
  • Pinder, Rich;
  • Ross, Ronald K;
  • West, Dee W;
  • Wright, William;
  • Ziogas, Argyrios;
  • Horn-Ross, Pamela L
  • et al.
Abstract

Objective

Whether alcohol consumption influences ovarian cancer risk is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between alcohol intake at various ages and risk of ovarian cancer.

Methods

Among 90,371 eligible members of the California Teachers Study cohort who completed a baseline alcohol assessment in 1995-1996, 253 women were diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer by the end of 2003. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results

Consumption of total alcohol, beer, or liquor in the year prior to baseline, at ages 30-35 years, or at ages 18-22 years was not associated with risk of ovarian cancer. Consumption of at least one glass per day of wine, compared to no wine, in the year before baseline was associated with increased risk of developing ovarian cancer: RR = 1.57 (95% CI 1.11-2.22), P (trend) = 0.01. The association with wine intake at baseline was particularly strong among peri-/post-menopausal women who used estrogen-only hormone therapy and women of high socioeconomic status.

Conclusions

Alcohol intake does not appear to affect ovarian cancer risk. Constituents of wine other than alcohol or, more likely, unmeasured determinants of wine drinking were associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer.

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