Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

Health risk perceptions and reasons for use of tobacco products among clients in addictions treatment.

  • Author(s): Campbell, Barbara K
  • Le, Thao
  • Gubner, Noah R
  • Guydish, Joseph
  • et al.
Abstract

INTRODUCTION:We examined rates of use, health risk perceptions and reasons for use of combustible and non-combustible tobacco products among clients enrolled in addictions treatment across the United States. METHODS:Participants (N = 1153) completed tobacco use surveys and rated health risk perception of all products. Users of non-cigarette products reported their main reason for use of each product. Logistic regression analyses examined associations between health risk perceptions and product use, including combustible cigarette use, and between reasons for use and non-cigarette product use. RESULTS:Cigarette smoking was reported by 77.5%, followed by use of e-cigarettes (26.6%), little filtered cigars (LFCs)/cigarillos (15.4%), smokeless tobacco (11.4%), and cigars (8.4%). Lower perceived health risk of cigarettes was associated with smoking cigarettes (OR = 0.985, 95% CI: 0.975-0.995, p = 0.005). Lower perceived health risk of e-cigarettes was associated with e-cigarette use (OR = 0.991, 95% CI: 0.984-0.998, p = 0.023). Users of cigars and users of LFC/cigarillos (versus other product use) were more likely to report their main reason for use as "enjoying flavor/ taste", and smokeless tobacco users were more likely to report "at times when can't smoke" as their main reason for use compared with other reasons. E-cigarette users were more likely to report to "reduce/quit cigarettes" as their main reason for use as compared to all other reasons except "reduce health risk". CONCLUSION:Treating smoking in addictions treatment should assess all tobacco product use, accuracy of health risk perceptions, and use of e-cigarettes to reduce/quit smoking, in order to promote cessation of combustible tobacco.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC's open access policies. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Item not freely available? Link broken?
Report a problem accessing this item