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Open Access Publications from the University of California

Global diversity and biogeography of bacterial communities in wastewater treatment plants.

  • Author(s): Wu, Linwei
  • Ning, Daliang
  • Zhang, Bing
  • Li, Yong
  • Zhang, Ping
  • Shan, Xiaoyu
  • Zhang, Qiuting
  • Brown, Mathew
  • Li, Zhenxin
  • Van Nostrand, Joy D
  • Ling, Fangqiong
  • Xiao, Naijia
  • Zhang, Ya
  • Vierheilig, Julia
  • Wells, George F
  • Yang, Yunfeng
  • Deng, Ye
  • Tu, Qichao
  • Wang, Aijie
  • Global Water Microbiome Consortium
  • Zhang, Tong
  • He, Zhili
  • Keller, Jurg
  • Nielsen, Per H
  • Alvarez, Pedro JJ
  • Criddle, Craig S
  • Wagner, Michael
  • Tiedje, James M
  • He, Qiang
  • Curtis, Thomas P
  • Stahl, David A
  • Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa
  • Rittmann, Bruce E
  • Wen, Xianghua
  • Zhou, Jizhong
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-019-0426-5#Ack1
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Microorganisms in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are essential for water purification to protect public and environmental health. However, the diversity of microorganisms and the factors that control it are poorly understood. Using a systematic global-sampling effort, we analysed the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences from ~1,200 activated sludge samples taken from 269 WWTPs in 23 countries on 6 continents. Our analyses revealed that the global activated sludge bacterial communities contain ~1 billion bacterial phylotypes with a Poisson lognormal diversity distribution. Despite this high diversity, activated sludge has a small, global core bacterial community (n = 28 operational taxonomic units) that is strongly linked to activated sludge performance. Meta-analyses with global datasets associate the activated sludge microbiomes most closely to freshwater populations. In contrast to macroorganism diversity, activated sludge bacterial communities show no latitudinal gradient. Furthermore, their spatial turnover is scale-dependent and appears to be largely driven by stochastic processes (dispersal and drift), although deterministic factors (temperature and organic input) are also important. Our findings enhance our mechanistic understanding of the global diversity and biogeography of activated sludge bacterial communities within a theoretical ecology framework and have important implications for microbial ecology and wastewater treatment processes.

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