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Locations of Physical Activity as Assessed by GPS in Young Adolescents.

  • Author(s): Carlson, Jordan A
  • Schipperijn, Jasper
  • Kerr, Jacqueline
  • Saelens, Brian E
  • Natarajan, Loki
  • Frank, Lawrence D
  • Glanz, Karen
  • Conway, Terry L
  • Chapman, Jim E
  • Cain, Kelli L
  • Sallis, James F
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4702023/
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Objectives

To compare adolescents' physical activity at home, near home, at school, near school, and at other locations.

Methods

Adolescents (N = 549) were ages 12 to 16 years (49.9% girls, 31.3% nonwhite or Hispanic) from 447 census block groups in 2 US regions. Accelerometers and Global Positioning System devices assessed minutes of and proportion of time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in each of the 5 locations. Mixed-effects regression compared MVPA across locations and demographic factors.

Results

Forty-two percent of adolescents' overall MVPA occurred at school, 18.7% at home, 18.3% in other (nonhome, nonschool) locations, and 20.6% near home or school. Youth had 10 more minutes (30% more) of overall MVPA on school days than on nonschool days. However, the percentage of location time spent in MVPA was lowest at school (4.8% on school days) and highest near home and near school (9.5%-10.4%). Girls had 2.6 to 5.5 fewer minutes per day of MVPA than boys in all locations except near school.

Conclusions

Although a majority of adolescents' physical activity occurred at school, the low proportion of active time relative to the large amount of time spent at school suggests potential for increasing school-based activity. Increasing time spent in the neighborhood appears promising for increasing overall physical activity, because a high proportion of neighborhood time was active. Increasing youth physical activity to support metabolic health requires strategies for increasing use of physical activity-supportive locations (eg, neighborhoods) and environmental and program improvements in unsupportive locations (eg, schools, homes).

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