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Geography matters: state-level variation in children's oral health care access and oral health status.

  • Author(s): Fisher-Owens, SA
  • Soobader, MJ
  • Gansky, SA
  • Isong, IA
  • Weintraub, JA
  • Platt, LJ
  • Newacheck, PW
  • et al.
Abstract

OBJECTIVES:To ascertain differences across states in children's oral health care access and oral health status and the factors that contribute to those differences. STUDY DESIGN:Observational study using cross-sectional surveys. METHODS:Using the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, we examined state variation in parents' report of children's oral health care access (absence of a preventive dental visit) and oral health status. We assessed the unadjusted prevalences of these outcomes, then adjusted with child-, family-, and neighbourhood-level variables using logistic regression; these results are presented directly and graphically. Using multilevel analysis, we then calculated the degree to which child-, family-, and community-level variables explained state variation. Finally, we quantified the influence of state-level variables on state variation. RESULTS:Unadjusted rates of no preventive dental care ranged 9.0-26.8% (mean 17.5%), with little impact of adjusting (10.3-26.7%). Almost 9% of the population had fair/poor oral health; unadjusted range 4.1-14.5%. Adjusting analyses affected fair/poor oral health more than access (5.7-10.7%). Child, family and community factors explained ∼¼ of the state variation in no preventive visit and ∼½ of fair/poor oral health. State-level factors further contributed to explaining up to a third of residual state variation. CONCLUSION:Geography matters: where a child lives has a large impact on his or her access to oral health care and oral health status, even after adjusting for child, family, community, and state variables. As state-level variation persists, other factors and richer data are needed to clarify the variation and drive changes for more egalitarian and overall improved oral health.

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