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Tissue Distribution of trans-Resveratrol and Its Metabolites after Oral Administration in Human Eyes.

  • Author(s): Wang, Shuaishuai
  • Wang, Zheng
  • Yang, Shuo
  • Yin, Tiemei
  • Zhang, Yaoli
  • Qin, Yuanjun
  • Weinreb, Robert N
  • Sun, Xufang
  • et al.
Abstract

Purpose. This study was performed to measure the concentration of trans-resveratrol and its three metabolites in human eyes. Methods. The patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment were included. The participants were orally given trans-resveratrol-based supplement (Longevinex®). A suitable amount of conjunctiva, aqueous humor, and vitreous humor were obtained during the operation. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was used to detect the concentration of trans-resveratrol and its three metabolites in the various samples. Results. The average concentration of resveratrol in the conjunctiva was 17.19 ± 15.32 nmol/g (mean ± SD). The concentration of resveratrol in the aqueous humor was close to the limit of detection, but its metabolites could be quantified. The concentrations of resveratrol metabolites in the aqueous humor can be detected. In the vitreous humor, the average concentration of resveratrol-3-O-sulfate was 62.95 ± 41.97 nmol/L. The sulfate conjugations of resveratrol were recovered in the conjunctiva, aqueous humor, and vitreous humor. Conclusions. Resveratrol and its three metabolites can be detected in the ocular tissues after oral administration. Although the concentration of parent resveratrol was low in the eyes, its metabolites could be detected and may have a role in the treatment of ocular diseases.

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