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Ethnic enclaves, discrimination, and stress among Asian American women: Differences by nativity and time in the United States.

  • Author(s): Morey, Brittany N
  • Gee, Gilbert C
  • Shariff-Marco, Salma
  • Yang, Juan
  • Allen, Laura
  • Gomez, Scarlett Lin
  • et al.
Abstract

OBJECTIVES:Living in ethnic enclaves may protect racial/ethnic minority populations from discrimination and stress by facilitating positive intergroup relations in those neighborhoods. This study examines how two different aspects of ethnic enclaves-neighborhood ethnic concentration and cultural institutions-are associated with discrimination and stress among Asian American women, and how these associations differ by nativity and time lived in the United States. METHOD:A community-based survey of Asian American women with geocoded residential addresses was linked with U.S. Census and business listing data. We created neighborhood variables of ethnic concentration and number of Asian cultural institutions. Analyses consisted of linear regression predicting day-to-day discrimination, general stress, and immigration stress. RESULTS:Findings revealed that for established immigrants and U.S.-born, higher ethnic concentration was associated with higher discrimination and general stress. For recent immigrants, higher ethnic concentration was associated with lower discrimination, general stress, and immigration stress. For all Asian American women, living in neighborhoods with more cultural institutions was associated with lower discrimination. For recent immigrants, living in neighborhoods with more cultural institutions was associated with lower general stress. CONCLUSIONS:This study highlights how ethnic enclaves are associated with discrimination and stress experiences differently, depending on nativity and time in the United States. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).

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