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Are the 50's, the transition decade, in choroid plexus aging?

  • Author(s): Tahira, Ana;
  • Marques, Fernanda;
  • Lisboa, Bianca;
  • Feltrin, Arthur;
  • Barbosa, André;
  • de Oliveira, Kátia Cristina;
  • de Bragança Pereira, Carlos Alberto;
  • Leite, Renata;
  • Grinberg, Lea;
  • Suemoto, Claudia;
  • de Lucena Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah;
  • Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto;
  • Jacob-Filho, Wilson;
  • Brentani, Helena;
  • Palha, Joana Almeida
  • et al.
Abstract

The choroid plexus (CP) is an important structure for the brain. Besides its major role in the production of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), it conveys signals originating from the brain, and from the circulatory system, shaping brain function in health and in pathology. Previous studies in rodents have revealed altered transcriptome both during aging and in various diseases of the central nervous system, including Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, a high-throughput sequencing of the CP transcriptome was performed in postmortem samples of clinically healthy individuals aged 50's through 80's. The data shows an age-related profile, with the main changes occurring in the transition from the 50's to the 60's, stabilizing thereafter. Specifically, neuronal and membrane functions distinguish the transcriptome between the 50's and the 60's, while neuronal and axon development and extracellular structure organization differentiate the 50's from the 70's. These findings suggest that changes in the CP transcriptome occur early in the aging process. Future studies will unravel whether these relate with processes occurring in late- onset brain diseases.

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