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The POLARBEAR cosmic microwave background polarization experiment

  • Author(s): Barron, D
  • Ade, P
  • Anthony, A
  • Arnold, K
  • Boettger, D
  • Borrill, J
  • Chapman, S
  • Chinone, Y
  • Dobbs, M
  • Edwards, J
  • Errard, J
  • Fabbian, G
  • Flanigan, D
  • Fuller, G
  • Ghribi, A
  • Grainger, W
  • Halverson, N
  • Hasegawa, M
  • Hattori, K
  • Hazumi, M
  • Holzapfel, W
  • Howard, J
  • Hyland, P
  • Jaehnig, G
  • Jaffe, A
  • Keating, B
  • Kermish, Z
  • Keskitalo, R
  • Kisner, T
  • Lee, AT
  • Le Jeune, M
  • Linder, E
  • Lungu, M
  • Matsuda, F
  • Matsumura, T
  • Meng, X
  • Miller, NJ
  • Morii, H
  • Moyerman, S
  • Myers, M
  • Nishino, H
  • Paar, H
  • Peloton, J
  • Quealy, E
  • Rebeiz, G
  • Reichardt, CL
  • Richards, PL
  • Ross, C
  • Shimizu, A
  • Shimmin, C
  • Shimon, M
  • Sholl, M
  • Siritanasak, P
  • Spieler, H
  • Stebor, N
  • Steinbach, B
  • Stompor, R
  • Suzuki, A
  • Tomaru, T
  • Tucker, C
  • Yadav, A
  • Zahn, O
  • et al.
Abstract

The polarbear cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment has been observing since early 2012 from its 5,200 m site in the Atacama Desert in Northern Chile. polarbear's measurements will characterize the expected CMB polarization due to gravitational lensing by large scale structure, and search for the possible B-mode polarization signature of inflationary gravitational waves. polarbear's 250 mK focal plane detector array consists of 1,274 polarization-sensitive antenna-coupled bolometers, each with an associated lithographed band-defining filter and contacting dielectric lenslet, an architecture unique in current CMB experiments. The status of the polarbear instrument, its focal plane, and the analysis of its measurements are presented. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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