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Prostate cancer patients' self-reported participation in research: an examination of racial/ethnic disparities.

Abstract

Purpose

We examined prostate cancer patients' participation in research and associated factors by race/ethnicity in a multiethnic sample.

Methods

Men with a new diagnosis of prostate cancer were identified through the California Cancer Registry. Patients completed a cross-sectional telephone interview in English, Spanish, Cantonese or Mandarin. Multivariable logistic regression models, stratified by race/ethnicity, estimated the associations of patient demographic and health characteristics with participation in (1) any research, (2) behavioral research, and (3) biological/clinical research.

Results

We included 855 prostate cancer patients: African American (19%), Asian American (15%), Latino (24%), and White (42%). In the overall model of participation in any research, African American men (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.54, 95% CI 1.63-3.94), and those with two or more comorbidities (OR = 2.20, 95% CI 1.27-3.80) were more likely to report participation. Men 65 years old and older (OR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.47-0.91), those who were married or living with a partner (OR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.45-0.98), and those who completed the interview in Spanish (OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.15-0.85) were less likely to report participating in any research. Stratified analyses identified racial/ethnic-specific sociodemographic characteristics associated with lower research participation, including Spanish or Chinese language, older age, and lower education.

Conclusion

African American prostate cancer patients reported higher research participation than all other groups. However, recruitment efforts are still needed to overcome barriers to participation for Spanish and Chinese speakers, and barriers among older adults and those with lower education levels.

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