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Hard exercise, affect lability, and personality among individuals with bulimia nervosa.

  • Author(s): Brownstone, Lisa M
  • Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E
  • Wonderlich, Stephen A
  • Joiner, Thomas E
  • Le Grange, Daniel
  • Mitchell, James E
  • Crow, Scott J
  • Peterson, Carol B
  • Crosby, Ross D
  • Klein, Marjorie H
  • Bardone-Cone, Anna M
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1471-0153(13)00074-3
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

The current study explores the personality traits of compulsivity (e.g., sense of orderliness and duty to perform tasks completely) and restricted expression (e.g., emotion expression difficulties) as potential moderators of the relation between affect lability and frequency of hard exercise episodes in a sample of individuals with bulimic pathology. Participants were 204 adult females recruited in five Midwestern cities who met criteria for threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). Compulsivity was found to significantly moderate the relation between affect lability and number of hard exercise episodes over the past 28 days, such that among those with high compulsivity, level of affect lability was associated with the number of hard exercise episodes; whereas, among those with low compulsivity, affect lability was not associated with the number of hard exercise episodes. The same pattern of findings emerged for restricted expression; however, this finding approached, but did not reach statistical significance. As such, it appears that affect lability is differentially related to hard exercise among individuals with BN depending upon the level of compulsivity and, to a more limited extent, restricted expression. These results suggest that, for individuals with BN with either compulsivity or restricted expression, focusing treatment on increasing flexibility and/or verbal expression of emotions may help in the context of intense, fluctuating affect.

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