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Variations of Soil Microbial Community Structures Beneath Broadleaved Forest Trees in Temperate and Subtropical Climate Zones

  • Author(s): Yang, Sihang
  • Zhang, Yuguang
  • Cong, Jing
  • Wang, Mengmeng
  • Zhao, Mengxin
  • Lu, Hui
  • Xie, Changyi
  • Yang, Caiyun
  • Yuan, Tong
  • Li, Diqiang
  • Zhou, Jizhong
  • Gu, Baohua
  • Yang, Yunfeng
  • et al.

Published Web Location

http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2017.00200
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

© 2017 Yang, Zhang, Cong, Wang, Zhao, Lu, Xie, Yang, Yuan, Li, Zhou, Gu and Yang. Global warming has shifted climate zones poleward or upward. However, understanding the responses and mechanism of microbial community structure and functions relevant to natural climate zone succession is challenged by the high complexity of microbial communities. Here, we examined soil microbial community in three broadleaved forests located in the Wulu Mountain (WLM, temperate climate), Funiu Mountain (FNM, at the border of temperate and subtropical climate zones), or Shennongjia Mountain (SNJ, subtropical climate). Although plant species richness decreased with latitudes, the microbial taxonomic a-diversity increased with latitudes, concomitant with increases in soil total and available nitrogen and phosphorus contents. Phylogenetic NRI (Net Relatedness Index) values increased from -0.718 in temperate zone (WLM) to 1.042 in subtropical zone (SNJ), showing a shift from over dispersion to clustering likely caused by environmental filtering such as low pH and nutrients. Similarly, taxonomy-based association networks of subtropical forest samples were larger and tighter, suggesting clustering. In contrast, functional a-diversity was similar among three forests, but functional gene networks of the FNM forest significantly (P < 0.050) differed from the others. A significant correlation (R = 0.616, P < 0.001) between taxonomic and functional β-diversity was observed only in the FNM forest, suggesting low functional redundancy at the border of climate zones. Using a strategy of space-for-time substitution, we predict that poleward climate range shift will lead to decreased microbial taxonomic a-diversities in broadleaved forest.

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