EXTH-19. EVALUATING THE ANTI-TUMOR EFFECT OF A NOVEL THERAPEUTIC AGENT, MAGMAS INHIBITOR, IN MALIGNANT GLIOMA
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EXTH-19. EVALUATING THE ANTI-TUMOR EFFECT OF A NOVEL THERAPEUTIC AGENT, MAGMAS INHIBITOR, IN MALIGNANT GLIOMA

  • Author(s): Di, Kaijun;
  • Du, Senjie;
  • Lepe, Javier;
  • Nandwana, Nitesh;
  • Das, Bhaskar;
  • Bota, Daniela
  • et al.
Abstract

Abstract BACKGROUNDS Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive infiltrative brain tumor, and has an extremely poor prognosis despite the use of multiple treatment modalities, including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Meanwhile, mitochondrial changes represent a significant part of cancer cell biology since cancer cells must survive and adapt to challenging microenvironments, specifically in conditions where tumor growth makes oxygen and glucose scarce. As GBM is characterized by extensive hypoxia-induced phenotypic changes such as abnormal vascular proliferation and necrosis, regulation of mitochondrial function could be a novel approach for treating GBM that currently lacks effective therapies. Magmas (mitochondria-associated protein involved in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor signal transduction) is a nuclear gene that encodes for the mitochondrial import inner membrane translocase subunit Tim16. We previously demonstrated that a novel Magmas inhibitor, BT#9, significantly exerted anti-tumor effect in glioma in vitro, and may cross the blood brain barrier in vivo, indicating that Magmas inhibitor may be a new chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of GBM. METHODS In this study, the antitumor effect of Magmas inhibitor BT#9 was tested in an orthotopic xenograft model of human GBM. The molecular mechanism of BT#9 was investigated using glioma cell lines. RESULTS The mice were tolerated to BT#9, and there was no statistical difference in the weight of animals between the control and MTD (Maximum-tolerated Dose, 50mg/kg) groups. The immunocompromised mice, intracranially implanted with human D-54 GBM xenografts, survived significantly longer than the controls (P< 0.5) when treated with BT#9 at MTD. In vitro study showed that the MAP kinase pathways are involved in BT#9-induced tumor suppression. DISCUSSION This is the first study on the role of Magmas in glioma in vivo. Our findings suggested that Magmas plays a key role in glioma survival and targeting Magmas by Magmas inhibitor has the potential to become a therapeutic strategy in glioma patients.

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