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Results of Phase 1 study on cytoreductive radical prostatectomy in men with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer.

  • Author(s): Yuh, Bertram E
  • Kwon, Young Suk
  • Shinder, Brian M
  • Singer, Eric A
  • Jang, Thomas L
  • Kim, Sinae
  • Stein, Mark N
  • Mayer, Tina
  • Ferrari, Anna
  • Lee, Nara
  • Parikh, Rahul R
  • Ruel, Nora
  • Kim, Wun-Jae
  • Horie, Shigeo
  • Byun, Seok-Soo
  • Ahlering, Thomas E
  • Kim, Isaac Yi
  • et al.
Abstract

Background:Preclinical and retrospective data suggest that cytoreductive radical prostatectomy may benefit a subset of men who present with metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa). Herein, we report the results of the first planned Phase 1 study on cytoreductive surgery. Methods:From four institutions, 36 patients consented to the study. However, four did not complete surgery because of rapid disease progression (n = 3) and another because of an intraoperatively discovered pericolonic abscess. Men with newly diagnosed clinical mPCa to lymph nodes or bones were eligible. The primary endpoint was the rate of major perioperative complications (Clavien-Dindo Grade 3 or higher) occurring within 90 days of surgery. Results:The mean age at surgery was 64.0 years. The 90-day overall complication rate was 31.2% (n = 10), of which two (6.25%) were considered major complications: one acute tubular necrosis requiring temporary dialysis and one death. In men with more than 6 months of follow-up, 67.9% had prostate specific antigen nadir ≤0.2 ng/mL, while one patient experienced a rapid rise in prostate specific antigen and another a widely disseminated disease that resulted in death 5 months after surgery. Altogether, these results demonstrate that cytoreductive radical prostatectomy is safe and surgically feasible in selected patients who present with mPCa . Yet, there may be a small subset of patients in whom surgery may cause a significant harm. Conclusion:Therefore, cytoreductive surgery in men with mPCa should be limited to clinical trials until robust data are available.

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