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Methodologies for Housing Justice Resource Guide

  • Author(s): Roy, Ananya
  • Rolnik, Raquel
  • Dalloul, Rania
  • Grandinetti, Tina
  • Hetterly, Eliot
  • Makhmuryan, Hayk
  • Miranda, Kimberly
  • Nicholson, Lydia
  • Ramos, Isuri
  • Wong, Diane
  • Chew, Amee
  • Ilano, Lauren
  • Lanweraju-Kadri, Tolu
  • Lowe, Albert
  • Reichle, Leon Rosa
  • Edwards, Earl
  • Hamlin, Madeleine
  • Jahn-Verri, Fernanda
  • Montano, Joel
  • Nevarez Martinez, Deyanira
  • Eidelman, Tessa
  • Jacobs, Bryan
  • Lopez, Sofia
  • Ordonez, Liliana
  • Sullivan, Esther
  • Lessa, Lucas
  • King, Hunter
  • Fang, Raymond
  • Granero Realini, Guadalupe
  • Healy, Meg
  • Young, Amy
  • Agrawal, Naveen
  • Colini, Laura
  • Kerrigan, Danielle
  • Lin, Margaretta
  • Trujillo, Luis
  • Azhar, Awais
  • Garrow, Eve
  • Goldfischer, Eric
  • Mejia, Nancy
  • Poe, Joshua
  • Editor(s): Roy, Ananya
  • Rolnik, Raquel
  • Graziani, Terra
  • Malson, Hilary
  • et al.
Abstract

This Resource Guide is the outcome of a Summer Institute on Methodologies for Housing Justice convened by the Institute on Inequality and Democracy at UCLA Luskin as part of the Housing Justice in Unequal Cities Network, which is supported by the National Science Foundation (BCS 1758774). Held in Los Angeles in August 2019, the Summer Institute brought together participants from cities around the world. As is the case with the overall scope and purpose of the Housing Justice in Unequal Cities Network, it created a shared terrain of scholarship for movement-based and university-based scholars. Dissatisfied with the canonical methods that are in use in housing studies and guided by housing justice movements that are active research communities, the Summer Institute was premised on the assertion that methodology is political. Methodology is rooted in arguments about the world and involves relations of power and knowledge. The method itself – be it countermapping or people’s diaries – does not ensure an ethics of solidarity and a purpose of justice. Such goals require methodologies for liberation. Thus, as is evident in this Resource Guide, our endeavor foregrounds innovative methods that are being used by researchers across academia and activism and explicitly situates such methods in an orientation towards housing justice.

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