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Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among persons who inject drugs in San Diego, California

  • Author(s): Armenta, RF
  • Collins, KM
  • Strathdee, SA
  • Bulterys, MA
  • Munoz, F
  • Cuevas-Mota, J
  • Chiles, P
  • Garfein, RS
  • et al.

Published Web Location

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/28284258
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

© 2017 The Union. BACKGROU N D : Persons who inject drugs (PWID) might be at increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and reactivation of latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) due to their injection drug use. OBJ E CTIVE S : To determine prevalence and correlates of M. tuberculosis infection among PWID in San Diego, California, USA. METHODS : PWID aged 718 years underwent standardized interviews and serologic testing using an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) for LTBI and rapid point-of-care assays for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. Independent correlates of M. tuberculosis infection were identified using multivariable log-binomial regression. RESULT S : A total of 500 participants met the eligibility criteria. The mean age was 43.2 years (standard deviation 11.6); most subjects were White (52%) or Hispanic (30.8%), and male (75%). Overall, 86.7% reported having ever traveled to Mexico. Prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection was 23.6%; 0.8% were coinfected with HIV and 81.7% were co-infected with HCV. Almost all participants (95%) had been previously tested for M. tuberculosis; 7.6% had been previously told they were infected. M. tuberculosis infection was independently associated with being Hispanic, having longer injection histories, testing HCV-positive, and correctly reporting that people with 'sleeping' TB cannot infect others. CONC L U S ION S : Strategies are needed to increase awareness about and treatment for M. tuberculosis infection among PWID in the US/Mexico border region.

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