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Low prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in early diagnosed and managed HIV-infected persons

  • Author(s): Crum-Cianflone, NF
  • Moore, DJ
  • Letendre, S
  • Roediger, MP
  • Eberly, L
  • Weintrob, A
  • Ganesan, A
  • Johnson, E
  • Rosario, RD
  • Agan, BK
  • Hale, BR
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3589242/
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Objective: To describe the prevalence of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) among early diagnosed and managed HIV-infected persons (HIV+) compared to HIV-negative controls. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study among 200 HIV+ and 50 matched HIV-uninfected (HIV-) military beneficiaries. HIV+ patients were categorized as earlier (<6 years of HIV, no AIDS defining conditions, and CD4 nadir >200 cells/mm3) or later stage patients (n = 100 in each group); both groups were diagnosed early and had access to care. NCI was diagnosed using a comprehensive battery of standardized neuropsychological tests. Results: HIV+ patients had a median age of 36 years, 91% were seroconverters (median window of 1.2 years), had a median duration of HIV of 5 years, had a CD4 nadir of 319, had current CD4 of 546 cells/mm3, and 64% were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (initiated 1.3 years after diagnosis at a median CD4 of 333 cells/mm3). NCI was diagnosed among 38 (19%, 95% confidence interval 14%-25%) HIV+ patients, with a similar prevalence of NCI among earlier and later stage patients (18% vs 20%, p = 0.72). The prevalence of NCI among HIV+ patients was similar to HIV-patients. Conclusions: HIV+ patients diagnosed and managed early during the course of HIV infection had a low prevalence of NCI, comparable to matched HIV-uninfected persons. Early recognition and management of HIV infection may be important in limiting neurocognitive impairment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Neurology.

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