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The submergence tolerance regulator Sub1A mediates stress-responsive expression of AP2/ERF transcription factors.

  • Author(s): Jung, Ki-Hong
  • Seo, Young-Su
  • Walia, Harkamal
  • Cao, Peijian
  • Fukao, Takeshi
  • Canlas, Patrick E
  • Amonpant, Fawn
  • Bailey-Serres, Julia
  • Ronald, Pamela C
  • et al.
Abstract

We previously characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) Submergence1 (Sub1) locus encoding three ethylene-responsive factor (ERF) transcriptional regulators. Genotypes carrying the Sub1A-1 allele are tolerant of prolonged submergence. To elucidate the mechanism of Sub1A-1-mediated tolerance, we performed transcriptome analyses comparing the temporal submergence response of Sub1A-1-containing tolerant M202(Sub1) with the intolerant isoline M202 lacking this gene. We identified 898 genes displaying Sub1A-1-dependent regulation. Integration of the expression data with publicly available metabolic pathway data identified submergence tolerance-associated pathways governing anaerobic respiration, hormone responses, and antioxidant systems. Of particular interest were a set of APETALA2 (AP2)/ERF family transcriptional regulators that are associated with the Sub1A-1-mediated response upon submergence. Visualization of expression patterns of the AP2/ERF superfamily members in a phylogenetic context resolved 12 submergence-regulated AP2/ERFs into three putative functional groups: (1) anaerobic respiration and cytokinin-mediated delay in senescence via ethylene accumulation during submergence (three ERFs); (2) negative regulation of ethylene-dependent gene expression (five ERFs); and (3) negative regulation of gibberellin-mediated shoot elongation (four ERFs). These results confirm that the presence of Sub1A-1 impacts multiple pathways of response to submergence.

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