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Open Access Publications from the University of California

Nanoparticle Measurements in Parallel Artificial Bilayers

  • Author(s): Smith, Tyler
  • Advisor(s): Schmidt, Jacob
  • et al.
Abstract

Artificial lipid bilayers have had a long history in the investigation of ion channels and pore proteins. They have been well established as a viable method as a detection tool via pore protein sensing but lack the ability to quickly and efficiently collect statistically useful data using traditional platforms. The utilization of the droplet bilayer method in particular has had significant improvements in scalability and automation. The development of a high throughput platform is pivotal for collecting large volumes of experimental data and to obtain statistically relevant datasets. The work performed in this thesis utilizes experimental observations and modified fabrication techniques to establish a more efficient method of bilayer reconstitution. In addition, numerous protocols were developed for testing nanoparticles in artificial plasma and lysosomal membranes in mass quantities. This improved platform utilizes simple electrical measurements to quantify the interactions between various nanoparticles and artificial membranes at various concentrations, ionic strengths and pH values to better understand biological mechanisms of interaction. In addition, the added improvements bring this platform one step closer to large scale sensing and screening applications.

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