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Marijuana use among US tobacco users: Findings from wave 1 of the population assessment of tobacco health (PATH) study

  • Author(s): Strong, DR
  • Myers, MG
  • Pulvers, K
  • Noble, M
  • Brikmanis, K
  • Doran, N
  • et al.
Abstract

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Background: With an increase in marijuana use among adults in the United States (US), understanding the potential impact of marijuana use on tobacco use and associated behavioral and health consequences, including respiratory conditions, is necessary. Method: Survey responses from Wave 1 of the nationally representative Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study were used to assess tobacco use and marijuana use among non-current tobacco users (n = 17,952) and current established tobacco-users classified as: cigarette only users (n = 8689), e-cigarette only users (n = 437), cigar only (traditional, cigarillo, or filtered) users (n = 706), hookah only users (n = 461), smokeless tobacco only users (n = 971), cigarette + e-cigarette users (n = 709), and users of multiple tobacco products (n = 2314). Results: When compared to non-current tobacco users, each tobacco user group except smokeless only users had higher odds (odds ratios ranging from 3.86–8.07) of reporting current marijuana use. Among current tobacco users, higher levels of tobacco dependence did not explain the relationship between tobacco use and marijuana use. Additionally, concurrent marijuana use was associated with lower odds of attempts to quit tobacco (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.79, 0.94, p < 0.001) and a higher probability (OR = 1.35, 95CI = 1.21, 1.51, p < 0.01) of reporting a history of respiratory disease. Conclusions: The association between concurrent use of tobacco and marijuana and higher tobacco dependence and lower rates of quit attempts suggests the potential for sustained tobacco use and deleterious health effects. Further, marijuana use may represent an additive risk for respiratory harm among concurrent users of tobacco and marijuana.

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