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Cerebrospinal fluid can be used for HIV genotyping when it fails in blood.

  • Author(s): Rotta, Indianara
  • Raboni, Sonia Mara
  • Ribeiro, Cléa Elisa Lopes
  • Riedel, Maristela
  • Winhescki, Maria da Graça
  • Smith, Davey M
  • Ellis, Ronald J
  • de Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4139176/
No data is associated with this publication.
Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License
Abstract

Blood plasma specimens are the clinical standard for HIV-1 pol gene genotyping from viral populations; however, it is not always successful, often from low viral loads or the presence of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors. Objective To describe the successful of HIV-1 genotyping in two samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), after genotype procedures failed from blood. Method Two HIV-infected patients enrolled in a neurocognitive research study were evaluated when standard HIV-1 genotyping failed from blood plasma samples. Genotyping was performed using the commercial system TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the OpenGene DNA Sequencing System (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA). Results CSF genotyping was performed via the same commercial platform and was successful in both cases. Conclusion This report demonstrates that CSF could be used as an alternate clinical specimen for HIV-1 genotyping when it fails from blood.

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