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Significance of Epicardial and Intrathoracic Adipose Tissue Volume among Type 1 Diabetes Patients in the DCCT/EDIC: A Pilot Study.

  • Author(s): Darabian, Sirous
  • Backlund, Jye-Yu C
  • Cleary, Patricia A
  • Sheidaee, Nasim
  • Bebu, Ionut
  • Lachin, John M
  • Budoff, Matthew J
  • DCCT/EDIC Research Group
  • et al.
Abstract

Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) patients are at increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). This pilot study sought to evaluate the relationship between epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) and intra-thoracic adipose tissue (IAT) volumes and cardio-metabolic risk factors in T1DM.EAT/IAT volumes in 100 patients, underwent non-contrast cardiac computed tomography in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial /Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) study were measured by a certified reader. Fat was defined as pixels' density of -30 to -190 Hounsfield Unit. The associations were assessed using-Pearson partial correlation and linear regression models adjusted for gender and age with inverse probability sample weighting.The weighted mean age was 43 years (range 32-57) and 53% were male. Adjusted for gender, Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant correlation between age and EAT/IAT volumes (both p<0.001). After adjusting for gender and age, participants with greater BMI, higher waist to hip ratio (WTH), higher weighted HbA1c, elevated triglyceride level, and a history of albumin excretion rate of equal or greater than 300 mg/d (AER≥300) or end stage renal disease (ESRD) had significantly larger EAT/IAT volumes.T1DM patients with greater BMI, WTH ratio, weighted HbA1c level, triglyceride level and AER≥300/ESRD had significantly larger EAT/IAT volumes. Larger sample size studies are recommended to evaluate independency.

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