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Kidney Function Indicators Predict Adverse Outcomes of COVID-19.

  • Author(s): Liu, Ye-Mao;
  • Xie, Jing;
  • Chen, Ming-Ming;
  • Zhang, Xiao;
  • Cheng, Xu;
  • Li, Haomiao;
  • Zhou, Feng;
  • Qin, Juan-Juan;
  • Lei, Fang;
  • Chen, Ze;
  • Lin, Lijin;
  • Yang, Chengzhang;
  • Mao, Weiming;
  • Chen, Guohua;
  • Lu, Haofeng;
  • Xia, Xigang;
  • Wang, Daihong;
  • Liao, Xiaofeng;
  • Yang, Jun;
  • Huang, Xiaodong;
  • Zhang, Bing-Hong;
  • Yuan, Yufeng;
  • Cai, Jingjing;
  • Zhang, Xiao-Jing;
  • Wang, Yibin;
  • Zhang, Xin;
  • She, Zhi-Gang;
  • Li, Hongliang
  • et al.
Abstract

Background

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a recently emerged respiratory infectious disease with kidney injury as a part of the clinical complications. However, the dynamic change of kidney function and its association with COVID-19 prognosis are largely unknown.

Methods

In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we analyzed clinical characteristics, medical history, laboratory tests, and treatment data of 12,413 COVID-19 patients. The patient cohort was stratified according to the severity of the outcome into three groups: non-severe, severe, and death.

Findings

The prevalence of elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN), elevated serum creatinine (Scr), and decreased blood uric acid (BUA) at admission was 6.29%, 5.22%, and 11.66%, respectively. The trajectories showed the elevation in BUN and Scr levels, as well as a reduction in BUA level for 28 days after admission in death cases. Increased all-cause mortality risk was associated with elevated baseline levels of BUN and Scr and decreased levels of BUA.

Conclusions

The dynamic changes of the three kidney function markers were associated with different severity and poor prognosis of COVID-19 patients. BUN showed a close association with and high potential for predicting adverse outcomes in COVID-19 patients for severity stratification and triage.

Funding

This study was supported by grants from the National Key R&D Program of China (2016YFF0101504), the National Science Foundation of China (81630011, 81970364, 81970070, 81970011, 81870171, and 81700356), the Major Research Plan of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (91639304), the Hubei Science and Technology Support Project (2019BFC582, 2018BEC473, and 2017BEC001), and the Medical Flight Plan of Wuhan University.

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