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Efficacy of trimethacarb as a small mammal repellent in no-till corn plantings

  • Author(s): Matschke, George H.
  • Bonwell, William R.
  • Engeman, Richard M.
  • et al.
Abstract

Trimethacarb (2,3,5-trimethylphenyl methycarbonate) was evaluated as a mouse repellent in no-till corn plantings. Two studies were conducted. One involved an early spring planting and included 5 treated and 5 control plots. The second involved a late spring planting and included 3 treated and 3 control plots. Species composition and relative abundance of small mammals were determined for each plot by trap and release before treatment. On the 10 early spring plots, species composition was 85% prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster), 14% deer mice (Peromyscus spp.), and 1% house mice (Mus musculus). On the 6 Iate spring plots, species composition was 66% prairie voles, 28% deer mice, and 6% house mice. Trimethacarb (15% by weight) was applied in a 15-20 cm band on the ground surface over the planted corn seed at a maximum rate of 9.2 kg/ha. Corn seeds consumed by small mammals and intact corn sprouts were counted when the corn was approximately 10 cm tall, or about 17 days after planting. At harvest, the numbers of corn stalks and yield in kg per ha were estimated. In the early spring planting, mice consumed a total of 657 and 755 seeds on the 200 sampling sites (treated and control plots, respectively). In the late spring planting, mice consumed a total of 122 and 87 seeds on the 120 sampling sites (treated and control plots, respectively). Differences between the mean numbers of seeds consumed by mice on the treated and control plots were not statistically significant in either planting. In the early spring plantings, a total of 1,784 and 1,641 intact sprouts were present on the 160 sampling sites {treated and control plots, respectively). In the late spring plantings, a total of 1,267 and 1,114 intact sprouts were present on the 120 sampling sites (treated and control plots, respectively). Differences between the mean numbers of intact sprouts on the treated and control plots were not statistically significant in either planting. The average numbers of stalks per ha at harvest for the early spring planting were 42,230 and 31,604 (treated and control plots, respectively); estimates for the late spring planting were at 42,929 and 40,597 (treated and control plots, respectively). Differences between the numbers of stalks on the treated and control plots were not statistically significant for either planting. Average yield for the early spring planting was 8492 kg/ha and 6267 kg/ha (treated and control plots, respectively); and for the late spring planting was 6618 kg/ha and 6831 kg/ha (treated and control, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in kg/ha between treated and control plots for either planting. These results indicate that trimethacarb is not an effective mouse repellent in no-till corn plantings.

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