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TNF alpha enhances cancer stem cell-like phenotype via Notch-Hes1 activation in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

  • Author(s): Lee, Sung Hee
  • Advisor(s): Shin, Ki-Hyuk
  • Kim, Reuben
  • et al.
Abstract

Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs; also known as tumor initiating cells) is defined as a small subpopulation of cancer cells within a tumor and isolated from various primary tumors and cancer cell lines. CSCs are highly tumorigenic and resistant to anticancer treatments. In this study, we found that chronic exposure to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), a major proinflammatory cytokine, enhances CSC phenotype of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells, such as an increase in tumor sphere-forming ability, stem cell-associated genes expression, chemo-radioresistance, and tumorigenicity. Moreover, activation of Notch1 signaling was detected in the TNF alpha-exposed cells, and suppression of Notch1 signaling inhibited CSC phenotype. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of a Notch downstream target, Hes-1, led to suppression of CSC phenotype in the TNF alpha-exposed cells. We also found that Hes1 expression is commonly upregulated in OSCC lesions compared to precancerous dysplastic lesions, suggesting the possible involvement of Hes1 in OSCC progression and CSC in vivo. In conclusion, inflammatory cytokine exposure may enhance CSC phenotype of OSCC, in part by activating the Notch-Hes1 pathway.

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